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Lawyers want the Constitution to cover climate and the environment

Although the fight for a sustainable climate and environment is an important issue in society, there is nothing about it in the Constitution.

But it’s time for it to be written. This is the message to the country’s politicians from a large number of legal experts, Berlingske writes.

The conclusion emerges from a study by Djøf’s law panel, which consists of 51 people such as professors from universities, judges, lawyers and legal experts from interest groups.

29 of them, corresponding to 57 percent, consider that our supreme legal document – the Constitution – is outdated when it comes to protecting the environment, nature and the climate.

Jens Elo Rytter, who is a professor of constitutional law and chairman of Djøf’s legal panel, believes that it will make a difference to have climate and environment added to the Constitution.

– My own view is that it is one of the most burning, fundamental issues for our generation and in this century, and it would be useful to include in the Constitution.

– I think it can have a signal value that you get a political direction and a legal policy commitment on the green. We have also seen that it can be used as a platform to conduct lawsuits, he says in a written response.

Norway, Sweden and Finland have already added climate and environmental provisions to their constitutions.

According to Jens Elo Rytter, this has led to a “paradigm shift, taking into account generations that come after those who vote now”.

Therefore, Denmark should also follow and add it to the Constitution, he emphasizes.

The Danish constitution dates from 1849. It was last revised 70 years ago.

An amendment to the Constitution requires that the Folketing first adopts the proposal for the new constitution.

A referendum will then be held. Here, a majority must vote in favor of the new constitution. But only if the majority make up at least 40 percent of all eligible voters in the country can it be adopted.

The conclusion emerges from a study by Djøf’s law panel, which consists of 51 people such as professors from universities, judges, lawyers and legal experts from interest groups.

29 of them, corresponding to 57 percent, consider that our supreme legal document – the Constitution – is outdated when it comes to protecting the environment, nature and the climate.

Jens Elo Rytter, who is a professor of constitutional law and chairman of Djøf’s legal panel, believes that it will make a difference to have climate and environment added to the Constitution.

– My own view is that it is one of the most burning, fundamental issues for our generation and in this century, and it would be useful to include in the Constitution.

– I think it can have a signal value that you get a political direction and a legal policy commitment on the green. We have also seen that it can be used as a platform to conduct lawsuits, he says in a written response.

Norway, Sweden and Finland have already added climate and environmental provisions to their constitutions.

According to Jens Elo Rytter, this has led to a “paradigm shift, taking into account generations that come after those who vote now”.

Therefore, Denmark should also follow and add it to the Constitution, he emphasizes.

The Danish constitution dates from 1849. It was last revised 70 years ago.

An amendment to the Constitution requires that the Folketing first adopts the proposal for the new constitution.

A referendum will then be held. Here, a majority must vote in favor of the new constitution. But only if the majority make up at least 40 percent of all eligible voters in the country can it be adopted.

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